The Pleasures of Life by Sir John Lubbock, Bart (One Volume Contains Part I and Part II)

The Pleasures of Life by Sir John Lubbock, Bart (One Volume Contains Part I and Part II) The Pleasures of Life by Sir John Lubbock, Bart (One Volume Contains Part I and Part II) Fiction

Parts One and Two, Published 1892 and 1893: Hardcover / Very Good Condition

Original red embossed cloth no jacket. Part one 199 clean and bright pages and part two 280 clean and bright pages, additional 2 pages of authors other books listing at the rear, previous owners dedication dated October 1895 on the first free page. Boards are firm and solid, just slightly rubbed with time, consistent with age.

Collection can be arranged by Appointment. Churchtown, Dublin 14
Postage service is also available.

A series of talks given at school and college occasions.

PART I

CHAPTER I
THE DUTY OF HAPPINESS

CHAPTER II
THE HAPPINESS OF DUTY

CHAPTER III
A SONG OF BOOKS

CHAPTER IV
THE CHOICE OF BOOKS

CHAPTER V
THE BLESSING OF FRIENDS

CHAPTER VI
THE VALUE OF TIME

CHAPTER VII
THE PLEASURES OF TRAVEL

CHAPTER VIII
THE PLEASURES OF HOME

CHAPTER IX
SCIENCE

CHAPTER X
EDUCATION


PART II

CHAPTER I
AMBITION

CHAPTER II
WEALTH

CHAPTER III
HEALTH

CHAPTER IV
LOVE

CHAPTER V
ART

CHAPTER VI
POETRY

CHAPTER VII
MUSIC

CHAPTER VIII
THE BEAUTIES OF NATURE

CHAPTER IX
THE TROUBLES OF LIFE

CHAPTER X
LABOR AND REST

CHAPTER XI
RELIGION

CHAPTER XII
THE HOPE OF PROGRESS

CHAPTER XIII
THE DESTINY OF MAN

The Right Honourable John Lubbock, 1st Baron Avebury PC FRS DCL LLD (30 April 1834 – 28 May 1913), known as Sir John Lubbock, 4th Baronet from 1865 until 1900, was a banker, Liberal politician, philanthropist, scientist and polymath.

He was a banker and worked with his family’s company, but also made significant contributions in archaeology, ethnography, and several branches of biology. He helped establish archaeology as a scientific discipline, and was also influential in nineteenth-century debates concerning evolutionary theory.

In addition to his work at his father’s bank, Lubbock took a keen interest in archaeology and evolutionary theory. He spoke in support of the evolutionist Thomas Henry Huxley at the famous 1860 Oxford evolution debate. During the 1860s, he published many articles in which he used archaeological evidence to support Darwin’s theory. In 1864, he became one of the founding members (along with Thomas Henry Huxley and others) of the elite X Club, a dining club composed of nine gentlemen to promote the theories of natural selection and academic liberalism. In 1865 he succeeded to the baronetcy. During the 1860s he held a number of influential academic positions, including President of the Ethnological Society from 1864–65, Vice-President of Linnean Society in 1865, and President of the International Congress of Prehistoric Archaeology in 1868. In 1865 he published Pre-Historic Times, which became a standard archaeology textbook for the remainder of the century, with the seventh and final edition published in 1913.

His second book, On the Origin of Civilization, was published in 1870. During 1871, he purchased part of the Avebury estate to protect its prehistoric stone monuments from impending destruction. During the early 1870s, he held the position of President of the Royal Anthropological Society from 1871–73, as well as the position of Vice President of the Royal Society in 1871. During this period he worked with John Evans, the other key figure in the establishment of the discipline of archaeology.

In 1865 Lubbock published what was possibly the most influential archaeological text book of the nineteenth century, Pre-historic times, as illustrated by ancient remains, and the manners and customs of modern savages. He invented the terms "Palaeolithic" and "Neolithic" to denote the Old and New Stone Ages respectively. More notably, he introduced a Darwinian-type theory of human nature and development. "What was new was Lubbock’s ... insistence that, as a result of natural selection, human groups had become different from each other, not only culturally, but also in their biological capacities to utilize culture."

He had extensive correspondence with Charles Darwin, who lived nearby in Down House. Lubbock stayed in Downe except for a brief period from 1861–65, when he lived in Chislehurst. Both men were active advocates of English spelling reform, and members of the Spelling reform Association, precursor to the Simplified Spelling Society. Darwin rented land, originally from Lubbock’s father, for the Sandwalk wood where he performed his daily exercise, and in 1874 agreed with Lubbock to exchange the land for a piece of pasture in Darwin’s property. When Darwin died in 1882, Lubbock suggested the honour of burial in Westminster Abbey, organising a letter to the dean to arrange this, and was one of the pallbearers.

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